Why do I have to register my dog as well as having it microchipped?

Although microchipping provides an excellent form of identification it is only the first step in registering your dog.

In NSW, all cats and dogs, other than exempt cats and dogs, must be microchipped by 12 weeks of age or before being sold or given away, whichever happens first.

If you fail to have your cat or dog microchipped when required to do so, you may be issued with a fixed penalty notice for $165 or a court may award a maximum penalty of up to $880. Where your dog is a restricted dog or a declared dangerous dog you may by issued with a fixed penalty notice for $1,320 or a court may award a maximum penalty of $5,500.

When your dog is registered under the Companion Animals Act it is provided with all the regulation and protection the N.S.W. Government and Council can provide. Council is also responsible for ensuring that companion animals and their owners co-exist with other members of the community who choose not to own dogs. The Companion Animals Act provides Council with a range of powers and responsibilities to achieve this. By registering your dog you can help to make sure that both your pet and the community have the benefit of information, assistance and regulation to ensure that the rights and needs of yourself and your animal are protected.

While it is Council’s responsibility to collect fees for registration, the fees are set by the N.S.W. Government.  All cats and dogs, other than exempt cats and dogs, must be registered by six months of age. The registration fee is a once-only payment, which covers the cat or dog for its lifetime in NSW, regardless of any changes in ownership. You are encouraged to have your cat or dog desexed before registering it.

Discounted registration fees apply to desexed cats or dogs. Having your cat or dog desexed prior to registration helps to reduce straying, fighting and aggression and antisocial behavior, such as spraying to mark territory. It also helps to reduce the number of unwanted pets born each year.

If you fail to register your cat or dog when required to do so you may be issued with a fixed penalty notice of $275, or a court may award a maximum penalty of up to $5500 or up to $6,500 if your dog is a restricted dog or a declared dangerous or menacing dog.

Oberon Council